When Did David Write Psalm 23?


Who write psalm 121 in bible?

Of the 150 psalms, the superscriptions attribute 73 to David, 11 to the sons of Korah (one of these [Ps 88] also mentioning Heman), 12 to Asaph (evidently denoting the house of Asaph; one to Moses, one to Solomon, and one to Ethan the Ezrahite.

Additionally, Psalm 72 is “regarding Solomon” and apparently was written by David. From Acts 4:25 and Hebrews 4:7 it is evident that Psalms 2 and 95 were written by David.

Psalms 10, 43, 71, and 91 appear to be continuations of Psalms 9, 42, 70, and 90 respectively. Therefore, Psalms 10 and 71 may be attributed to David, Psalm 43 to the sons of Korah, and Psalm 91 to Moses.

There are indications that Psalm 119 may have been written by young prince Hezekiah.

This leaves over 40 psalms without a specific composer named or indicated.
Psalm 121 must be one of these 40 psalms.

the writer of Psalm 121 is simply called (The psalmist)

What do you think was going on in David?s life when he wrote Psalm 23?

I think the writer of Psalm 23 was thinking of his having all that he truly needed, a mental image that has helped many folks over the hurdle of seeing others with all kinds of STUFF that makes them look important, but isn't really essential.

History is full of music that is attributed to monarchs, when it was some musician who actually made it happen. I suspect this is what happened with the Psalms as well.

Does it matter who wrote it? Well, I suppose it might. It's easy for someone with a cushy situation to write about how he has everything he needs, but for a servant to write those same sentiments makes the sentiments, coming from a common man, all the more powerful. It makes the Psalms speak to me all the more powerfully, so I believe it was not the king who wrote them, but of course there's no way to prove it one way or the other, aside from a few signs in the texts that the Psalms come from different origins.

You will find Psalms in other places in the Bible and there is at least one example of a psalm that appears to be a first draft of what eventually became another psalm.

These were works in progress and probably they were written over a period of time by several folks.

what was king david going through when he wrote psalm 145?

the story is in the king james bjble

It's also in every other Bible and Jewish Psalm book!

Psalms 107 to 150 are in Book Five of the Psalms and this particular one is an overflowing of David's praise to the Lord for all His greatness and goodness. He may have had Deuteronomy 7:9-10 in mind for verse 10 and thereafter.

Edit for that reference above to Ps. 146 - check out what David also said in Ps. 73:23-26 & 49:15 & 90:10.

How old was King David when he wrote the Psalms attributed to him?

Different Psalms were written at different periods in his life.

Often the caption of the Psalm describes a historical event connected with it and recorded in First or Second Samuel or First Chronicles.

For example:

Psalm 52
For the director of music. A maskil of David. When Doeg the Edomite had gone to Saul and told him: "David has gone to the house of Ahimelech."

see:

http://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=1%20Samuel%2022:6-23&version=NIV

Who wrote Psalms 116?

I would really like to know, because who ever it was had to have been in a deep depression, and God brought him out of it.

David wrote Psalm 116. 73 Psalms were assigned to David, twelve to Asaph, (50; 73-82), two to Solomon (72; 127), one to Moses (90), one to Ethan (89), and twelve to the sons of Korah, a family of Levitical singers (42-49; 84; 85; 87; 88). Psalm 116 is one of the 'Hallelujah Psalms, sometimes called Hallel. David was known as God's favorite' even though he sinned greatly by committing adultery with Bathsheba and the ordered killing of her husband Uriah. His sins caused him great sorrow and depression and anguish, but Psalm 116 describes his thanks for the restoring of his soul. If you are interested in the Psalms set to music for singing, there is 'The Book of Psalms for Singing'. I think it is available from 'Westminster Publications' or the 'Reformed Presbyterian Church' websites.



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