When Did Ahmose Reign?


Who is Ahmose the pharaoh?

Help!..I am having trouble finding what was Ahmose the pharaoh education like what he did and all of his accomplishments in life. I hope someone can answer this ASAP!

"Ahmose I (sometimes written Amosis I, "Amenes" and "Aahmes" and meaning Born of the Moon) was a pharaoh of ancient Egypt and the founder of the Eighteenth dynasty.

During his reign, he completed the conquest and expulsion of the Hyksos from the delta region, restored Theban rule over the whole of Egypt and successfully reasserted Egyptian power in its formerly subject territories of Nubia and Canaan.[6] He then reorganized the administration of the country, reopened quarries, mines and trade routes and began massive construction projects of a type that had not been undertaken since the time of the Middle Kingdom. This building program culminated in the construction of the last pyramid built by native Egyptian rulers. Ahmose's reign laid the foundations for the New Kingdom, under which Egyptian power reached its peak. His reign is usually dated to about 1550–1525 BC."

queen ahmose in ancient egypt?

why was queen ahmose important during her time in ancient africa?

He was king,During his reign he completed the conquest and expulsion of the Hyksos from the delta region, restored Theban rule over the whole of Egypt and successfully reasserted Egyptian power in its formerly subject territories of Nubia and Canaan.He then reorganized the administration of the country, reopened quarries, mines and trade routes and began massive construction projects of a type that had not been undertaken since the time of the Middle Kingdom. This building program culminated in the construction of the last pyramid built by native Egyptian rulers. Ahmose's reign laid the foundations for the New Kingdom, under which Egyptian power reached its peak. His reign is usually dated to about 1550–1525 BC.

Who is Amos Nefreteri?

I just need to know about this Egytian.

Queen Ahmose-Nefertari of Egypt was the sister-wife of Egypt's Pharaoh Ahmose I. She had at least two children—Amenhotep I and Ahmose-Meritamon, who then would become the next king and queen of Egypt. Ahmose-Nefertari was the regent for Amenhotep when Ahmose died and Amenhotep was too young to run the country. Her name apperars on many monuments from Saï to Tura. She is attested as living until at least the first year of Thutmosis I, so she apparently outlived her son, who reigned himself for at least 21 years. She at first held the title of Second Prophet of Amun, but renounced it in either the 18th or 22nd year of Ahmose I and became the first God's Wife of Amun. When she died, she became the last queen to be worshipped in a Theban funerary cult until the time of the High Priest of Amun, Herihor, in the beginning of the 21st Dynasty.

She lived from 1570BC - 1505BC.

When did they stop making pyramids?

Abydos which lies in the eight nome of Upper Egypt, about 300 miles south of Cairo, on the western side of the Nile and about 9.5 miles from the river is the site of the last royal Egyptian Pyramid. One of the buildings discovered in this area is a temple that likely was dedicated to Ahmose Nefertary, the wife and sister of the Pharaoh Ahmose, who ruled from about 1550 to 1525 B.C. and built Egypt’s last pyramid.
Of all the pyramids built in Egypt, that of Ahmose at Abydos is one of the most intriguing. It signals the end of the Pyramid age and to some extent, a changing of the guards in funerary practices. The earliest pyramids were focused on the sun god, Re, but even prior to Ahmose, the mythology surrounding the funerary god, Osiris, was being incorporated into the substructures of the later pyramids. By building his complex at Abydos, Ahmose certainly intended to associate his mortuary cult more directly with Osiris. After Ahmose, the kings of Egypt would, for the most part, completely abandon the pyramid structure.

However, Ahmose's predecessors in the 17th Dynasty (Second Intermediate Period) were buried under similarly steeply angled, though much smaller pyramids. Dr. Harvey suggests that Ahmose's pyramid was intended to evoke a memory of the powerful national rulers of earlier periods, and hence reinforce his legitimacy as their heir. Given the substantial size of Ahmose's pyramid, this is an attractive suggestion

Who is Ahhotep II? What did she do? Roles?

The naming / numbering by Egyptologists of the queens named Ahhotep has changed during the years.

During the late nineteenth century, Egyptologists thought that Ahhotep I was the wife of Seqenenre Tao II. The coffins of Deir el Bahari and Dra' Abu el-Naga' were both thought by some experts to be hers. Also, Ahhotep II was thought to be the wife of Amenhotep I as the coffin from the Deir el Bahari cache was considered to belong to a queen called Ahhotep II.

During the 1970s it was noted that the Deir el Bahari coffin bears the title King's Mother yet Amenhotep I had no son. Therefore, the title must refer to the mother of Ahmose I. In 1982 Robins suggested that Ahhotep I was the occupant of the gilded coffin from Dra' Abu el-Naga'. Ahhotep II is the queen mentioned on the Deir el Bahari coffin and Ahhotep III is the Queen mentioned on the statue of a prince Ahmose.

Following Dodson and Hilton (2004), it is now considered that Ahhotep I was the wife of Seqenenre Tao II and the mother of Ahmose I. Ahhotep II is now regarded as the queen identified from the gilded coffin found at Dra' Abu el-Naga' and, therefore, possibly a wife of Kamose. (It is no longer considered that there was a queen called Ahhotep III.

This interpretation by Dodson and Hilton has been used in this article.

Ahhotep II is thought to be the wife of Kamose and possibly the mother of Queen Ahmose-Sitkamose. It is possible that Ahhotep II is identical to a queen known as Ahhotep I. If so, she may have been married to Tao II instead.

The title of King's Mother is only found on the coffin from Deir el Bahari and not on the funerary equipment from Dra' Abu el-Naga'. It could be argued that Ahhotep II was a royal wife but never the mother of a pharaoh, and hence not the same person as Ahhotep I

Ahhotep II was buried in Dra' Abu el-Naga' and rediscovered in 1858 by workmen employed by Auguste Mariette. The tomb contained her mummy (destroyed in 1859) and gold and silver jewelry. An inscribed ceremonial axe head made of copper, gold, electrum and wood was decorated with a Minoan style griffin. Three golden flies were included and were awards usually given to people who served and acquitted themselves well in the army. A couple of items bore the name of Kamose, but more were inscribed with the name of Ahmose I.

The Dra' Abu el-Naga' coffin and the items associated with it all have inscriptions using an early form of the Iah glyph. The representation of the hieroglyph changed between years 18 and 22 of Ahmose I. The use of the early form of Iah suggests that Queen Ahhotep II died sometime before year 20 of Ahmose. This suggests that this queen is not Ahhotep, mother of Ahmose, because that queen appears on a stela dated to Amenhotep I and possibly survived into the reign of Thutmose I.



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