How Did Bf Skinner Contribution To Psychology?


what was BF Skinner's views on nature and nurture?

This is a psychology question....

Skinner was a behaviourist. He believe very firmly in nurture. He believe we were all a black box and a product of environmental learning. Operant conditioning....


Skinner conducted pioneering and innovated his own school of Radical Behaviorism, which seeks to understand behavior as a function of environmental histories of reinforcing consequences. He is known as the inventor of the operant conditioning chamber (or Skinner box), a research tool used to examine the orderly relations of the behavior of organisms (such as rats, pigeons and humans) to their environment. He is the author of Walden Two, Beyond Freedom and Dignity, Verbal Behavior, Science and Human Behavior and numerous other books and articles. He discovered what is now called operant conditioning and articulated the now widely accepted term reinforcement as a scientific principle of behavior. His position reflects the extension of the influence of physicist Ernst Mach's The Science of Mechanics to the subject of psychology.[13] Skinner's pioneering research reflected the dual influence of whole organism research in Ivan Pavlov and Jacques Loeb.[14]

Hey - psychology homework help?

Okay, I have to write a powerpoint about BF Skinner. I have 5 slides, excluding the title slide and the bibliography slide. What's required for the presentation: A Biography Defend Why They're on the List (there was a list of 25 psychologists we picked from) And their important contributions So far, I have his biography completed. I don't need help with that haha. It's his contributions.. I have the Skinner Box and Radical Behaviorism. I feel that only "7" slides for a presentation is one or two short.. and I don't know what else to mention in a slide. There was his Project Pigeon, air crib, and the books he wrote. What do you all suggest?

I did a conditioning report earlier this year. Mention other related scientists, their contributions, and how they relate to Skinner. Definitely involve his books.

Other than that, I've got nothing else.

B.F. Skinner's approach to personality is based on?

A. cognitive theory. B. psychoanalysis. C. humanism. D. behaviorism.

Burrhus Frederic Skinner's Theory is mainly based on Behaviorism (Learning Perspective).

He conducted pioneering work in psychology and innovated his own school of Radical Behaviorism, which seeks to understand behavior as a function of environmental histories of reinforcing consequences. He is known as the inventor of the operant conditioning chamber (or Skinner box: is a laboratory apparatus used in the experimental analysis of behavior to study animal behavior), a research tool used to examine the orderly relations of the behavior of organisms (such as rats, pigeons and humans) to their environment.

Skinner asserted that positive reinforcement is more effective at changing and establishing behaviour than punishment. He also suggests that the main thing people learn from being punished is how to avoid getting punished the next time.


Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/B._F._Skinner#Radical_behaviorism

;-)

When and how did the history of health psychology begin?

doing a paper on the history of health psychology for History and systems class, how did it come to be and what is it's main focus?

In the second half of the 19th century (1879), psychology became a more organized experimental field of study when Wilhelm Wundt founded the first phychological research laboratory in Leipzig, Germany. Wundt and others of that time approached psychology with: “Every physical event has a mental counterpart, and every mental event has a physical counterpart.”

At this time, Ivan Pavlov also made important contributions to the science of psychology. Pavlov developed procedures associated with classical conditioning. One of his well known experiments was conditioning a dog to associate a bell ringing (stimulus) with food. The effect: after a few repetitions, the dog produced a physical response to the sound of the bell - he salivated. Pavlov referred to this learned relationship as a conditional reflex (now called Conditioned Response).
History of Psychology: Applied Psychology

In the 1890s, soon after the development of experimental psychology, various kinds of applied psychology began to appear as well:

* scientific pedagogy (science of teaching)
* educational theory
* application of psychology to industry, law, and other professions
* first psychological clinic
* first program of mental testing

One of the most well known psychiatrists, Sigmund Freud, developed an independent approach to the study of the mind called psychoanalysis, which has been widely influential.

History of Psychology: Behavioral Psychology

The 20th century saw the formulation of behaviorism which was popularized by B.F. Skinner who was recently named in a survey as the most influential psychologist of his time. Behaviorism proposed limiting psychological study to that of overt behavior, since that could be quantified and easily measured. Skinner influenced education as well as psychology. He asserted that positive reinforcement is more effective at changing and establishing behavior than punishment. This theory has also influenced parenting methods.

Can gestalt theory be considered a science?

I basically want to find out oif the Gestalt theory of Psychology can be considered a science depending on the methods it uses to study subject matter. For example, does it se introspection, structuralism or experiments with chemicals or apparatus?

Gestalt Theory can be considered a science as long as it adheres to the scientific method. The methods it uses are: experiments, introspection, observations, interviews, and questionnaires.

The two main schools of thought regarding whether Gestalt Theory is a science or not are behaviourism and cognitive psychology.

The most important and earliest intropsectionists, cognitive scientists, were: William James and Wilhelm Wundt.

However, behaviourism arose with the likes of people like Skinner and Watson, and behaviourists argued that for psychology to be an objective science then it would need to study what is actually observable (behaviour) and not the mind.

This debate is on going in psychology.




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